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JU science communication

Why doesn’t nature like squares?

19.03.2019
Famous Austrian artist Friedrich Hundertwasser once said that ‘the straight line is something cowardly drawn with a rule, without thought or feeling; it is a line which does not exist in nature’. But where does nature’s seeming inability to form regular shapes come from? We asked Dr Paweł Jedynak from the Department of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry to tell us more about natural geometry.
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Kraków archaeologists continue their excavations in southern Jordan

14.03.2019
In the coming days, researchers from the JU Institute of Archaeology will start another season of excavations. This year, the team led by Dr Piotr Kołodziejczyk plans to take a closer look at the mountainous region near the city of At-Tafilah.
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Turning green... but not with envy

04.03.2019
We are all explorers and the need for exploration drives us to discover uncharted territories, including the mysteries of far-away galaxies and the edges of the known universe, whereas few of us know that the lawn under our feet is still full of unfathomable mysteries. A group of researchers from the JU Department of Plant Physiology and Biochemistry is working to shed more light on this issue. Their research aims to answer an apparently trivial question: how plants become green?
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JU scientists to work on a catalytic converter for diesel engines

22.02.2019
The development of an effective structural catalytic converter to reduce the amount of nitrogen oxides in fumes emitted by diesel engines and remove soot particles from them will be the goal of a joint effort of Polish and Chinese researchers. The project, headed by Prof. Zbigniew Sojka from the Jagiellonian University Faculty of Chemistry, will be run within the framework of the first bilateral grant competition organised by the National Research and Development Centre (Poland) and the Ministry of Science and Technology of the People’s Republic of China.
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JU astronomers among creators of a new sky map

20.02.2019
An international team of more than 200 astronomers from 18 countries has published the first phase of a major new radio sky survey at unprecedented sensitivity using the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) telescope. The survey reveals hundreds of thousands of previously undetected galaxies, shedding new light on many research areas including the physics of black holes and how clusters of galaxies evolve.
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6 anti-vaxxer myths

21.01.2019
The last few years marked a dramatic rise in distrust towards vaccination. A somewhat substantial portion of the general population became suspicious of the procedure, as it’s one of the very few performed on healthy people, particularly children. Additionally, vaccination is quite often administered involuntarily. These misgivings are further deepened by various anti-vax movements which seek to downplay the benefits of vaccination and change the policies that regulate it.
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Do beetles rule the world?

17.01.2019
The earth is dominated by humans, whose activity contributes to the rapid decline in biodiversity on our planet. Yet, if we put members of all catalogued species together, every fourth of them would be a... beetle! What is the reason for the fact that these insects constitute such a large proportion of living beings on our globe? We asked Dr hab. Stanisław Knutelski from the Department of Entomology at the JU Institute of Biology and Biomedical Studies to shed more light on this issue.
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Thrilling discoveries at Nea Pafos, Cyprus

17.01.2019
For the last 8 years, researchers from the Jagiellonian University Institute of Archaeology have been delving deep into the history of Nea Pafos, an ancient city located in Cyprus. During the last year’s excavation season, they have discovered that it was much larger than it was previously thought.
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JU archaeologists discover a unique Mayan bath

07.01.2019
A unique steam bath carved in rock was discovered by Jagiellonian University researchers conducting excavations in the ancient Mayan city of Nakum in Guatemala. The more than 2,500-year-old structure could have also been the site of religious rituals.
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To sleep or not to sleep - that is the question

04.01.2019
We intuitively know that sleep is important for our health and wellbeing. Probably all of us have experienced the negative consequences of its shortage, such as impaired concentration, slower reaction times or inability to engage in more strenuous activities. It’s estimated that over a quarter of Poles suffer from a chronic shortage of sleep. It has also turned out that sleep deficiency has a negative impact on the periods of rest.
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