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JU Research

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Jagiellonian University research

The JU science communication unit frequently conducts interviews with Jagiellonian University experts and specialists from various fields, discussing interesting issues related to the world, civilisation, culture, history, biology, medicine, chemistry, and many more. Below you will find the latest five articles translated into English.

Forensics in the 21st century: the basics and the challenges. Part I

Forensics (also called criminalistics) emerged as a science in the 19th century. We asked Dr Ryszard Krawczyk from the JU Chair in Forensic Science about its focus development, problems, and challenges that it faces in the 21st century.

Read more here.

A trip to the past. Kraków 100 million and 100 thousand years ago

When walking around the Kraków Main Square or camping in a nearby forest, have you ever asked: ‘What did this place look like in the past?’. We know we have – and we decided to dig deep, deep enough to find dinosaurs. In our search for answers, we were assisted by two researchers from the JU Institute of Geological Sciences – Dr Michał Stachacz and Krzysztof Ninard.

Read more here.

Bunions: how we damage our own feet

Bunions are an ailment that’s very familiar to most people. In spite of this, many underestimate the first symptoms of this unpleasant and painful foot deformity.

Read more here.

A smartphone instead of a pickaxe. Archaeology in the 21st century

A doctoral student from the Jagiellonian University Institute of Religious Studies won the “Diamond Grant” for his research project devoted to rock art in Kondoa region in Central Tanzania from the archaeological and ethnological perspective. 26-year-old Maciej Grzelczyk discovered rock paintings in Swaga Swaga Game Reserve.

Read more here.

Cosmic ghost particles

For the first time, scientists have been able to pinpoint a source of neutrinos outside of our galaxy. The extremely light and nigh-invisible elementary particle spotted by scientists has originated in the TXS0506+56 galaxy – a blazar – as evidenced by gamma ray observations.

Read more here.

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